Lead and Communicate about Becoming Trauma-Informed

Becoming a trauma-informed organization requires clear communication about the transformation process, and support from staff at all levels of an organization.

Following are resources for becoming a trauma-informed care champion at your organization.

Become a Champion

Learn how trauma-informed care can benefit your patients and staff and take steps to champion a trauma-informed approach across your organization. The following tools give a high-level overview of important trauma-informed care topics and feature individuals who have championed a trauma-informed approach in their own organizations.

Resources

video series

Trauma-Informed Care Champions: From Treaters to Healers features providers and patients describing the benefits of trauma-informed care. Use the videos with employee and patient audiences to help demonstrate the value of trauma-informed care. CHCS, 2018

video

How Childhood Trauma Affects Health Across a Lifetime is a compelling TEDMED talk by Nadine Burke Harris, MD, MPH, FAAP, founder and CEO of the Center for Youth Wellness, that provides an overview of ACEs and toxic stress.

journal article

From Treatment to Healing: The Promise of Trauma-Informed Primary Care describes from a physician’s perspective the promise of a trauma-informed model of primary care. Women’s Health Issues, 2015

infographic

10 Key Ingredients for Trauma-Informed Care highlights the causes and health consequences of trauma, and ways providers and organizations can become trauma-informed. This “scaleable” document can be printed at any size — use it as a hand out or print as a poster. CHCS, 2017

brief

Laying the Groundwork for Trauma-Informed Care offers practical recommendations for health care organizations looking to create a more welcoming clinical environment for patients who have experienced trauma. CHCS, 2018

brief

Key Ingredients for Successful Trauma-Informed Care Implementation outlines practical strategies and policy considerations for adopting trauma-informed approaches to care in health care settings. CHCS, 2016

report

SAMHSA’s Concept of Trauma and Guidance for a Trauma-Informed Approach introduces the concept of trauma and offers a framework for how organizations, systems, and service sectors can become trauma-informed. SAMHSA, 2014

Communicate the Benefits

Communicate the advantages — for both patients and staff — of creating a trauma-informed environment.

Resources

presentation slides

Understanding the Effects of Trauma on Health explores the causes of trauma and how it can impact an individual’s health. CHCS, 2018

presentation slides

What is Trauma-Informed Care? provides a primer on the organizational and clinical components of trauma-informed care. CHCS, 2018

video series

Trauma-Informed Care Champions: From Treaters to Healers features providers and patients describing the benefits of trauma-informed care. Use the videos with employee and patient audiences to help demonstrate the value of trauma-informed care. CHCS, 2018

video

5 Steps Toward Trauma-Informed Care: What Can You Do Tomorrow? features Dr. Eddy Machtinger, director of the Women’s HIV Program at University of California, San Francisco, who offers a simple roadmap to help organizations promote trauma-informed care. CHCS, 2018

infographic

10 Key Ingredients for Trauma-Informed Care highlights the causes and health consequences of trauma, and ways providers and organizations can become trauma-informed. This “scaleable” document can be printed at any size — use it as a hand out or print as a poster. CHCS, 2017

infographic

Encouraging Staff Wellness in Trauma-Informed Organizations highlights the impact of chronic stress on staff, and strategies that organizations can use to promote staff wellness. This “scaleable” document can be printed at any size — use it as a hand out or print as a poster. CHCS, 2016

brief

Strategies for Encouraging Staff Wellness in Trauma-Informed Organizations outlines the impact of chronic work-related stress and provides examples of two organizations that prioritize staff wellness: Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers and Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services of Drexel University. CHCS, 2016

brief

Trauma-Informed Care: Opportunities for High-Need, High-Cost Medicaid Populations provides an introduction to trauma-informed care and describes how this approach can be adopted to better serve patients, including examples from three innovative programs across the country. CHCS, 2015

Learn from Other Organizations

Learn how other organizations adopted trauma-informed approaches to care, including strategies used to help communicate their mission to leadership and staff along the way.

Resources

webinar

Implementing Trauma-Informed Care into Organizational Culture and Practice features speakers from the San Francisco Department of Public Health and Montefiore Medical Group discussing strategies for implementing trauma-informed organizational practices across large health care systems and provider practices. CHCS, 2017

webinar

Implementing Trauma-Informed Care in Pediatric and Adult Primary Care Settings features speakers from the Center for Youth Wellness and the University of California’s Women’s HIV Program as they discuss strategies for implementing trauma-informed care in pediatric and adult primary care settings. CHCS, 2017

case study

Implementing Trauma-Informed Practices throughout the San Francisco Department of Public Health details how the San Francisco Department of Public Health is training all 9,000+ public health employees on the impact of trauma, and facilitating a department-wide trauma champions learning community. CHCS, 2018

seek Patient Input

Solicit patient input early on, and find ways to sustain ongoing patient and community member feedback. Incorporating patient feedback can help an organizations’ trauma-informed care strategy move from the conceptual stage to a person-centered, customized approach. Some trauma-informed organizations solicit patient input through formal arrangements such as patient advisory boards, while others create informal opportunities for patients to share feedback and build relationships with employees.

Resources

case study

Incorporating Patients’ Voices at the Women’s HIV Program: University of California, San Francisco explores how one trauma-informed organization used a patient advisory panel to tailor services to the needs of patients with trauma histories. CHCS, 2018

report

Strategically Advancing Patient and Family Advisory Councils in New York State Hospitals describes the landscape, prevalence, and characteristics of patient and family advisory councils in New York hospitals, and identifies best practices and offers recommendations for implementing these types of advisory boards. New York State Health Foundation, 2018

report

Working with Patient and Families as Advisors: Implementation Handbook offers guidance for hospitals looking to partner with patients and families as strategic advisors to improve quality and safety of services provided. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2013

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